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The ISTD logo

The ISTD logo today

ISTD Logo

 Who can use the logo?

ISTD members, ISTD faculties and all ISTD departments.

Approved Dance Centres are also permitted to use a special logo in order to promote themselves as centres of dance teaching excellence.

When can the logo be used?

For publishing (print or web), promotional material, programmes, events or advertising. ISTD members may use the ISTD logo for the following:

Online 

  • School or personal business website
  • Facebook page
  • Blog page
  • Email newsletter

In Print

  • Headed paper
  • Business cards
  • Complimentary slips
  • Pull-up or display banners
  • Window stickers or displays
  • School signage such as posters
  • Advertisements (in print or online) 

Please note that only current ISTD members may use the ISTD logo, so please bear this in mind when printing items which may be used for more than one year, such as external signage or banners for your school. 

The ISTD logo is intended to help members promote their association with the Society and may be used on promotional items such as those listed. It is NOT intended for use on official school or personal administrative documents, such as invoices.

If you are unsure about whether the ISTD logo is appropriate for use on a certain item or to check that the logo you have is the most current version, please contact us to check. 

Please click here to download the ISTD Brand Guidelines.

ISTD Brand Guidelines 2014

Contact us

If you have an questions about the logo, how or when you should use it, please contact our in-house design team:

Tamsin Moore (Monday to Wednesday)
Design & Publications Manager
tmoore@istd.org
Tel: +44 (0)20 7377 1577 ext. 821

Bhairvi Gudka (Monday to Friday)
In-House Graphic Designer
bgudka@istd.org
Tel: +44 (0)20 7377 1577 ext. 822

 


A History of the ISTD logo

The logo of the Society was selected by Cyril Beaumont and he initiated its use in the Dance Journal (now known as DANCE magazine) in 1924 during his time as Editor.

It was given the official title of ‘The Crowning of Terpsichore’, to which a reference was made in the first issue of the Dance Journal in September 1907, in the closing remarks of the foreword written by the Editor, who was at that time Charles d’Albert.

“We are living in a strenuous age. We cannot ask for the universe to be put back and a return of yesterday with its old traditions and dances of another generation. The footsteps of the past are faint and hardly to be discerned, but the Story of the Dance has been handed down to us even from the most remote Ages. Feet long since gone to rest have danced; teachers with loving hands have garnered the dances so that the present generation may live in the long ago – live again in the dances they loved best.

“Ours is but the business of the story-teller, who lingers over these dark grey shadows of the silent past, but will endeavour to recall for those who are the solemn guardians of the Divine Art of dancing.

“We will, however, admit modern truth into our Orthodoxy and thereby enhance and glorify the Art we profess and live in, elevating it on a high pedestal and enobling its votaries and teachers. We will keep inviolate the shimmering mist of the silent past, but allow the Sun of Truth and progress to shine through it and crown Terpsichore with a halo of dignity.”

Many years later, in an article in the Summer 1956 issue of the Dance Journal, a misunderstanding concerning the emblem was corrected. At that time, Ford Motor Company introduced three new models called The Three Graces, this title being accompanied by something very similar to the three figures in the Society’s logo.

This led to widespread belief that the logo had a connection with the Three Graces. However, the writer of the article, alas unnamed, states that “it would appear certain the central figure on the emblem (logo) is the Muse Tersichore, and that the two outer figures are attendant nymphs, [which] has been confused with [the Three Graces] merely because it has three female figures.”

Terpsichore, which means “the whirler of the Dance,” is a figure from Greek mythology. She presided over choral dance and song and was one of the nine muses, daughters of the god Zeus and Mnemosyne. 

The two figures accompanying Terpischore in the Society’s logo are thought to be Euterpe and Calliope, but it is possible that one may be Melpomene. Whatever their names, these three figures have been present in nearly all versions of the logo, which has been through many changes over the years.

A statuette of the Crowning of Terpsichore was given to the Society at a Council meeting on 3rd November 1946 by a lady called Mildred Bult, who had treasured it for many years. She had become a member in 1908 and was elected to council four years later. The Chairman at that time, Victor Silvester, accepted the gift with grateful pleasure on behalf of the Society and the statuette, having resided at London College of Dance for a number of years, is now held at the Society’s Headquarters.